Child-like Faith

As I’ve said in other posts, I do not believe that God causes trials. But He clearly does allow difficult times to come upon even those that are closest to Christ. (If you don’t believe this, please study the life of the Apostle Paul).

When you read the Old Testament, especially the book of Job, you’ll find that people of those times believed trials and tribulations only came upon the ungodly. Most of the book of Job is his so-called “friends” trying to figure out what Job did or didn’t do to deserve these horrible trials. Poor Job sits at their feet scraping his boils trying to defend himself against their baseless accusations.

Trials humble us and expose self-righteousness in others and in ourselves.

I’m thankful that I don’t have friends like Job. Today, when looking upon those going through difficult trials, the humbled believer will likely think, “There but for the grace of God go I.” So we usually don’t have to deal with people like Job’s friends today, but self-accusing thoughts do come and they can be even harsher than Job’s “friends.”

It’s true that, for good or bad, we reap what we sow. Being a Christian doesn’t exempt us from the health problems associated with smoking and obesity or the financial problems of living above our means. But I’ve seen Christians experience so many trials and tragedies (health and financial problems and horrible accidents…) that do not follow a simple pattern of cause and effect. ALS is one of these – there’s no known cause, yet I used to torment myself searching my past trying to find something so I could blame myself for this horrible disease.

It’s not that I had some kind of sick desire to add to my long list of mistakes, sins and dumb decisions, I just wanted things to be understandable – to fit a simple pattern of sowing and reaping.

This is one of the first lessons this 18-year trial with ALS taught me: man-made religion is simple, true faith is not. Religion looks for simple answers and this seems to be the “default setting” for humanity. In that sense I’m normal. Having the child-like faith that Jesus told us we needed goes against every adult instinct; it seems so illogical, and illogical is really difficult for reasonable adults.

“Truly I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child will not enter it at all.” (Mark 10:15)

trust

Will you trust the unseen God when you face a trial that doesn’t fit the simple and logical law of sowing and reaping?

Spiritually speaking, answering “yes” to this question is to forfeit our right to adulthood. But I finally came to the point when I realized that this is the only way to receive the abundance of grace needed during these horrible trials – when things just don’t make sense. Before this revelation my spiritual walk was much like my physical walk; many stumbles and painful falls.

Children can understand simple things, but they have to trust adults when comprehension is beyond them. This is genuine humility and trust. If fallible adults receive this kind of trust from children, how much more should an infallible God receive this kind of child-like trust from even the most knowledgeable of adults?

Reality, in fact, is usually something you could not have guessed. That is one of the reasons I believe Christianity. It is a religion you could not have guessed. If it offered us just the kind of universe we had always expected, I should feel we were making it up. But, in fact, it is not the sort of thing anyone would have made up. It has just that queer twist about it that real things have. So let us leave behind all these boys’ philosophies–these over simple answers. The problem is not simple and the answer is not going to be simple either.” C.S. Lewis

Thank you for reading,

Bill

About Bill Sweeney

In 1996, Bill was diagnosed with ALS (“Lou Gehrig’s Disease”) and the doctors told him he had 3-5 years to live. He is now completely paralyzed and unable to speak, but by God’s grace, he’s still alive and through his blog shares a message of hope in Christ - Unshakable Hope!

Posted on November 21, 2014, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 147 Comments.

  1. gretahartmann

    Hi Bill, please forgive my previous reply! My iPad is misbehaving this morning! I just wanted to commend you on a great and true post. The quote by C.S. Lewis is perfect to be paired with childlike faith. Thank you for some wonderful insight and inspiration!
    Greta

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  2. Thank you once again for your deeply honest and hard won wisdom. I am giving a presentation to a group of retired teachers to acquaint them with various blogs that I find edifying and challenging. I am using several of yours. I’ve been following your blog for about two years now and it has been pure grace for me. God bless you for allowing God to use you in such a powerful way with people from far and wide.

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  3. “Trials humble us and expose self-righteousness in others and in ourselves.”

    Wow, Bill. This post is inspired. I’m going to read it over and over.

    Sending new year hugs. 😄

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  4. This has a lot of good points!!! Good read.
    But one question-you say you don’t believe God causes trials, but didn’t God GIVE Satan permission to mess with Job? I just would like your opinion on what counts as causation, versus allowance.

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    • Great question, Michael. I suppose it does sound like splitting hairs, but I think most parents learn the fine difference between cause and allow. Like most kids, God’s children usually learn better through experience than teaching. It’s not God’s perfect will, but it’s His permissive will (to allow trials).

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  5. Thanks for this great post, Bill. This last year was a difficult year for our family. It was a year though, like non other, where my faith has grown so much. I have seen His love for me displayed in so many amazing ways. Blessings to you, dear blogging friend. I am praying that you sense His closeness to your heart and find opportunities to share His love with many many others. Happy New Year!

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    • Thank you, Heidi. I’m sorry that 2014 was a difficult year for your family, but I’m glad that you allowed God to grow your faith. It seems that every trial we have to choose to become bitter or better.

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  6. This is so profound, Bill, I have had to return to it. Grievous suffering — entirely unmerited suffering — and loss (particularly on the part of a loved one) are, I think the greatest test of our faith. We want to feel in charge of our lives. Sovereignty was the very temptation in the Garden. But God is greater than we are. His plans and purposes are greater than we can even imagine. Our challenge is to trust that His love for us is equal to them. Jesus’ life forever shows us that it is.

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  7. I can relate to trying to find a reason for trials…to try and make some sense of them even if it means it may be your own fault somehow. That you are reaping something you have sown.
    I was in a serious bicycle accident about three months ago and am just about recovered now. I broke five bones – all of them on the right side of my face. Even though I knew, intellectually, there was no sowing and reaping involved working through the idea of it was still a part of the healing process for me. It didn’t take me as long to get through it as it has in the past for smaller things though, so maybe that’s growth. I’ll take it! Wonderful insights as in all of your writing. Thank you

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  8. Thank you so much for your visit and for liking some of my posts. May the God of creation bless you more abundantly in the name of Jesus Christ.

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  9. Loved this part, ” If fallible adults receive this kind of trust from children, how much more should an infallible God receive this kind of child-like trust from even the most knowledgeable of adults?” so true!

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  10. Thank you for the reblog! I’m new to the blogging world so I missed it the first time. Child-like faith and trust in adults… I’ve developed that child-like faith and trust this last year with 7 surgeries and the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. It’s that very thing that allows me to get up each day with hope in my soul and a song in my heart. 🙂

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  11. Reblogged this on On the Edge Again and commented:
    Had to reblog! Excellently written.

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  12. Let me add….I truly got saved DURING the darkest time with no where else to turn to in the world. My early father had passed and for once I was more scared than ever before. That is when I truly began to learn how to put my trust in Jesus and understand what that meant. Before when I thought I was saved I was going through the motions. It was different after God took me by the hand and walked with me in the darkness. This time I knew that I knew that I knew I was saved. I am thankful for the dark times in my life for those are the times I draw closer to my God, my Rock, my refuge, my fortress!

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  13. Amen! I always say, we must have child like faith. Many people don’t have it. My youngest soon does not. Many I know don’t. That is something you cannot teach, that I know of. The Holy Spirit must envelope you and be like an all consuming fire. Many try to make God fit into their box. Their view of what He should look like. God is beyond our comprehension. He is EVERYTHING, He is perfect and true. He is light to see us through the darkest times. He is joy in the highest peaks. I praise our Father in Heaven! Come Lord Jesus come! Merry Christmas!

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  14. Bill,
    I love these lines:

    “Will you trust the unseen God when you face a trial that doesn’t fit the simple and logical law of sowing and reaping? Spiritually speaking, answering “yes” to this question is to forfeit our right to adulthood.”

    I’ve never thought about forfeiting my right to adulthood. Yet it’s simple, direct and true. ALS forces this choice. And, given your statement, so does following Jesus.

    Many thanks for this inspirational post so close to Christmas and the New Year. My prayer and wish is to become childlike in ways I haven’t dreamed of before. Just writing the words makes me want to take them back. But the alternative isn’t pretty.

    Elouise

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  15. Wonderful post. God really spoke to me through it. I’m going through a difficult patch with a friend in and out of hospital for severe depression (a Christian) and this post helped me put it in perspective.

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  16. You have hit the “nail on the head”. Child-like faith is the way we should live. Deut. 29:29 informs us that we don not know everything but what we do know let us ho;d onto Great post!

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  17. I had to come back here and comment. I have seemed to get caught up in my life lately, and yet when I see that you have posted, I always want to take time to really let you know how much each post impacts me! Even if I can just LIKE it at the time, I fully intend to take time later to comment. Hmmm… hasn’t happened too much lately. The road is paved with good intentions. 🙂
    As you know by now, being such a loyal reader… I am all about the child inside of me. The part of the child that I don’t want to lose, is in fact that child like faith that I draw from as much as possible because I have grown hardened in my old age. I think the wonder of children and the innocent trust they come to the table with, is inspiring. You are so right. How can we not trust God with that same unquestioning blind faith, we expect our kids to have as they blindly take our hand and trust us to get across the street safely? So to speak.
    I have learned that in the times I forget to even reach for God’s hand and run blindly into the traffic is when I fail myself the most.
    I love your posts. They make me think and remind me to slow down and find the faith that started, not blindly, but with childlike faith that is in it’s purest form rooted from pure, innocent love. Thank you my friend for slowing me down.
    x0
    di

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  18. Always inspiring to visit with you 🙂
    The last part of the post blew me away … It’s absolutely true…

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  19. Thanks for your encouraging words, Bill. There is no “simple.” And it’s OK if we don’t know or have all the answers. We know The One Who does.

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  20. Very Good Post Bill, Have a peek at John chapter nine; I have re – re – re – re read it so many times in the last 12 years.

    Neither Bill nor His mom or Dad sinned…but that the Glory of God might be revealed in You.

    I love Job, did you ever notice that His three friends sat on the ground with him for three days and likely three nights and said not a word? that drives me nuts ! especially when they finally did speak it was stupid!

    Okay at least they were there right dumb and the other dumber brothers. Sorry maybe my mind has snapped. but I think it a bit funny. And when my life went the way of Job, I found out that I had No friends, not even dumb ones.

    Don’t try to blame some remote sin or mistake for your disease Bill, It might end up being your greatest gift

    Y/T Hubert

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    • Thank you, Hubert. You make some great points. In fairness to Job’s so-called friends, we should probably view them and that whole book in the context of that time. Many don’t know that the book of Job is the oldest book in the Bible, written before the five books of Moses. They didn’t have a Bible to shape their view of God. That’s one of the reasons I find that book so fascinating.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I love Job to Bill I think you and I can relate to him on a very personal level, Loosely quoted, I don’t remember the exact verse somewhere around chapter 8 i think Is my favourite passage where Job is rebuking his buddies, and says, Yeah You guys are the one’s all right and Im sure all wisdom will die with you! But if you’d just be quiet, that would be your greatest help. Like I said more like a paraphrase than a quote.

        Im not sure if I believe that Job is “The oldest” book of the Bible Bill, I have heard that before, but I doubt it, because Genesis 1 says in the beginning…: And at one point Job is referring to the ancients, those of the anti- deluvian area “Before Noah’s flood.”

        It’s great to hear from you Bill feel free to visit my Blog any time and God bless you.

        https://hubertsbest.wordpress.com

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  21. I cannot tell you how much this post means to me. I identified with all of it. This part really sums it up well:

    “Children can understand simple things, but they have to trust adults when comprehension is beyond them. This is genuine humility and trust. If fallible adults receive this kind of trust from children, how much more should an infallible God receive this kind of child-like trust from even the most knowledgeable of adults?”

    This verse is one that I have thought about on a number of occasions:

    “Truly I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child will not enter it at all.” (Mark 10:15)

    It is not our tendency as adults to do that. The Lord knows that, yet He is both able and willing to penetrate our hearts in a way that is past our understanding. It always starts with Him.

    Thank you so much for sharing this comforting and encouraging post.

    Blessings,
    Theresa

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  22. Thank you, Bill, for yet another thought-provoking post. Growing in faith day-by-day! I hope you and your family had a wonderful Thanksgiving!

    God bless,

    Patricia

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  23. You are the best, Unshakable Hope, and I always eagerly open you posts. Happy Thanksgiving! Julia Motherway

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

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  24. Thank you for such a timely message.

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  25. Powerful “from-the-trenches” advice,–thank you! Only occasionally do we get a glimpse of the purpose behind our trials. I wrote about such a glimpse yesterday: http://mitchteemley.com/2014/11/24/my-mothers-death-an-irrational-joy/

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  26. Reblogged this on verawrites and commented:
    An encouraging read for anyone struggling with anything – poor health, financial troubles, relationship challenges. God loves you every one of His children, and He will help you if you trust Him and let Him.

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  27. Reblogged this on We Just Look Up and commented:
    Such an eloquent explanation of how we should face trials. Trust. Childlike trust. That’s what our Heavenly Father asks of us. He is the Perfect Parent who works all things for our good, yet we continually doubt Him and struggle to submit to Him. How much peace we forfeit when we fight against His will.

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  28. We are indeed called to keep our childlike faith and trust God, as our Father, in all things. Your eloquent post demonstrates this so beautifully, as does the C S Lewes quote. It really is so far from simple….thank you for this Bill, lovely to read you here again and God bless you and your beautiful family 🙂

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  29. Amen! So good to hear from you. The simplest truths are the hardest, perhaps because they are not what we want to hear. We need to hear them over and over. Thanks for helping us hear hopefully enough times until we “get” it.

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  30. Your insights into the challenge of understanding trials and tribulations are profound. Your comment about us wanting logical reasons for why things happen just makes me recognize how much not being in control of circumstances is hard for me to deal with. Lewis is so right. The problem itself is complicated. Why would I ever think the solution would be any less complicated? Living in and with the mystery of the greatness and mighty power of God isn’t easy. It’s the constant letting go of my rights to understand or organize it. Thanks, Bill, for your humble insights–so profound because you’re living a reality I haven’t been asked to live. You and your family are walking in a powerful place of grace–bowls full of it–that I haven’t had to seek. I’m grateful for your honesty and genuineness.

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  31. Powerful words! So thankful for your blog and your perspective. Be blessed!

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  32. Thank you for a great post. There are times we all need to remember to trust God, no matter what. Blessing to you.

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  33. Yes, your insight and wisdom are such blessings. Thank you for using your experience to encourage us to grow! You are so right– the mature Believer has the most childlike faith… This level of trust and belief is something God is still polishing in me. I feel slow to learn, some days more than others. Sigh. 🙂 Praying great blessings for you as you touch hearts for Christ!

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  34. So blessed by your insight and your example. May God continue to be your source of strength and may he continue to use you to reach others for Jesus’ sake. Praying for you today.
    Connie

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  35. lessons we learn in trials are usually very important. Sometimes, we may not understand, then, we trust.

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  36. We want everything to make sense–but sometimes it doesn’t and no matter what we do…the square peg won’t fit into the round hole or vice versa. It takes being like a child and lots of faith.

    Yeah, I’m glad you don’t have Job’s friends, too. 😀 ….. I have enough for the both of us, lol. Take care, Bill! What a great post! – Amy 🙂

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  37. God Bless you Bill and thank you.
    Larry Blue

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  38. Reblogged this on Lighting the Lamp and commented:
    This post reminds me that many of God’s most faithful followers praised Him while IN the fiery furnace, not when they were safely delivered from it. The following scripture comes to mind: “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, 4 to an inheritance incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you, 5 who are kept by the power of God through faith unto salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. 6 Wherein ye greatly rejoice, though now for a season, if need be, ye are in heaviness through manifold temptations: 7 that the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ: 8 whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now ye see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory: 9 receiving the end of your faith, even the salvation of your souls.” (1 Peter 1:3-9)

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  39. Made me weep, Bill.

    My beautiful mother passed away going on five years ago. She was very uncomfortable for many months, having lost her freedom and independence. But despite her condition, she maintained her edge, her wonderful sense of humor, an inner strength, and her dignity. She maintained her dignity. She did not let the circumstances defeat her. I don’t remember any of us hearing her complain about her condition. She rode it out. She accepted what her life had become.

    And then, after reaching the end of the trail, because of the grace of God, because of his great love, because of everything He did for all of us, she went home to be with Him.

    I had spent a lot of time with her and was with her in the end. She taught me a very valuable lesson:

    While we have life, we must live life, regardless of the condition of our life.

    Thank you, my brother. This awesome post is worth about a million sermons. Be blessed.

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  40. Bill, I like what you said about God not causing the trials, and yet He can use them for our good. That is a miracle in of itself. The C.S. Lewis quote is a perfect ending to your wise and thoughtful post.

    Blessings ~ Wendy ❀

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  41. Beautifully expressed, Bill, as usual. I, too, am drawn to the book of Job. May God bless you as you bless the rest of us.

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  42. It is so true that there is nothing simple about understanding why Christians have the trials that they do.. and yet I suppose the simple thing and yet the not so simple thing is to ‘trust’ God in whatever the circumstances… Diane

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  43. Blessed by your message ~ Amen :Y

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  44. “Children can understand simple things, but they have to trust adults when comprehension is beyond them. This is genuine humility and trust. If fallible adults receive this kind of trust from children, how much more should an infallible God receive this kind of child-like trust from even the most knowledgeable of adults?”

    Amen, Bill. Thanks for this.

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  45. Thank you for continuing to inspire.

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  46. Thanks Bill for checking out my blog and following. I hope there is something there you will enjoy, something to make you smile and maybe even make your heart smile.
    Blessings,

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  47. Thank you Bill for sharing your story and you insights. You are an inspiration to us all. Blessings to you and yours.

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  48. Sorry Bill I put my comment on the wrong Post although it is responding to both your messages.

    Thank you again for sharing your life’s ups and downs with us and yes we all experience suffering and hardship regardless of being Christians or not. We live in a fallen world it is not how God created it, which was very good and Satan now has won control of it because of the fall which we see with Job but he can only go so far, also accidents happen, people hurt us and yes Satan also puts us to the test seeking to try and cause us to fall away, meaning reject Jesus the unforgivable sin and we also reap what we sow but God does not willingly afflict us which includes willingly allow us to suffer, but when Satan seeks to temp us to sin, God Lovingly strengthens us and helps us endure as we see confirmed in the Scripture below, He knows those who are His and it’s not His will anyone Perishes, He is patient giving us time to repent.

    Isaiah 43:1-3 – Do not be afraid, for I have ransomed you. I have called you by name; you are mine. When you go through deep waters and great trouble, I will be with you. When you go through rivers of difficulty, you will not drown! When you walk through the fire of oppression, you will not be burned up; the flames will not consume you. For I am the LORD, your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Saviour.”

    Jeremiah 29 :11-12 For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.

    We ourselves do not willingly allow those we Love to suffer or do we put them to hard testing to prove themselves but we do confirm God’s Truth by their words and actions and as you said Bill and if they think their own goodness saves them they are without eternal Hope, only True heart repentance which shows we believe in Jesus as our Lord and Saviour saves us and we will show we have Salvation by our words and actions, as the Scripture confirms and it also confirms it is Satan not God who afflicts us.

    Lamentations 3: 33 For God doth not afflict willingly nor grieve the children of men.

    1 Peter 1:6-7 Wherein ye greatly rejoice, though now for a season, if need be, ye are in heaviness through manifold Temptations: That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ:

    James 1:12-14 Blessed is the man that endureth Temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that Love Him. Let no man say when he is Tempted, I am Tempted of God: for God cannot be Tempted with evil, neither Tempteth He any man But every man is Tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed.

    Christian Love in Christ Jesus – Anne.

    Like

  49. Having once suffered from an undiagnosed lung condition that made me beg God to be taken home, I can so relate to this post. I especially liked these two paragraphs:

    “It’s not that I had some kind of sick desire to add to my long list of mistakes, sins and dumb decisions, I just wanted things to be understandable – to fit a simple pattern of sowing and reaping.

    This is one of the first lessons this 18-year trial with ALS taught me: man-made religion is simple, true faith is not. Religion looks for simple answers and this seems to be the “default setting” for humanity. In that sense I’m normal. Having the child-like faith that Jesus told us we needed goes against every adult instinct; it seems so illogical, and illogical is really difficult for reasonable adults.”

    Like

    • Thank you, Rene. One of the worst symptoms of ALS is the breathing difficulties so I can relate to your lung condition. There’s nothing worse than fighting to breathe; I have those days and I know what you mean about wanting to just give up and go home. So thankful for my breathing machine so I can sleep at night. I’m glad that your lung condition is behind you – it would be really hard to rescue people if you had to keep stopping to catch your breath 🙂

      Like

  50. Reblogged this on Sweet Rains and commented:
    Excellent blog post for anyone who is struggling with trying to figure out why something is happening and what they must have done wrong to deserve it… OR for those who immediately think a person is struggling because of some sin in their life that needs to be confessed and repented of.

    Like

  51. You have done a great job of explaining the difference between religion looking for simple answers, and faith, with is illogical as far as human thought goes. I am so thankful the Lord has given me faith, to deal with ALS. There is no other way to deal with it. Thanks so much for sharing your wisdom.

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  52. Thank you, Bill, for your wise counsel. Child-like trust in Almighty God is the most mature response we can have, isn’t it. You have earned the right (ten times over) to preach this sermon!

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  53. Excellent article! It may not always be easy for us to “lean not on our own understanding” but it is what we have been called to do. Blessings!

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  54. I completely resonate with the problems of reaping and sowing. There are too many things that happen that cannot be explained with this simple logic. I am thankful for the reminder that we need to wait patiently, trust, and take whatever good we can from all situations. There is always good present – we need to focus on that.

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    • Thank you, Erica. You are so right about the unexplainable, tragedies like losing your husband to Lyme disease. Praying for you and your kids as you face your first Thanksgiving and Christmas without Jim.

      Like

  55. Bill, thank you south for sharing your hard-earned insights. I’m glad that even though I want to, I don’t have to understand it all. Blessings, every day.

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  56. Dear Bill,

    You have helped me in a time of great trial. I don’t know if you’ve noticed in my blog, but my son died a week ago from today. His funeral was yesterday.

    With all my heart, I am seeking to turn this one over to the Lord and simply trust in His love, compassion, mercy and grace.

    Thanks so much, Bill.

    (((Hugs)))

    Like

  57. Excellent post! When I read it I couldn’t help but think of the man born blind (John 9). Jesus’ disciples ask Him who sinned, the man or his parents, that he was born this way? But Jesus responds, “It was neither that this man sinned, nor his parents; but it was so that the works of God might be displayed in him” (v. 3). This event caused quite a stir in the community, but the truth of God was demonstrated. Some chose to see it whereas others chose to be blind themselves (namely, the Pharisees). Even though you are still experiencing your trial, I believe that you are light to others, sharing God’s truth just as you did today. Thank you! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Lauren. It didn’t occur to me when I was writing this, but the story of the man born blind is a great example. It’s kind of a turning point where Jesus is teaching His followers (those with ears to hear) that bad things don’t just happen to “sinners.”

      Liked by 1 person

  58. Thanks for this balance Bill…Doug

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  59. Dark times force me into that kind of child-like trust, and I have to learn the lesson over and over again. I’m thankful for His overwhelming grace!

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  60. Reblogged this on Billy's Sugarpants and commented:
    I needed this today…thank you.

    Like

  61. Thank you very much for the re-blog, Bruce. Happy Thanksgiving!

    Like

  1. Pingback: “Child-like Faith” 11/26/2014 by Bill Sweeney | God's group

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